Vodafone Mobile Broadband

  • 'Refurbished' iPad deals are previously returned, reset, tested, with full warranty
  • BT Wi-Fi and Wi-Fi access on London Underground via Virgin Media

Who are Vodafone?

When it comes to standing the test of time, Vodafone wins hands down. It has been in the mobile business since the start and the same goes for 3G mobile broadband: it has a good name across the board, from reliability to service, and much like its branding it relies on reputation rather than flashy bells and whistles. Vodafone is pretty much the only choice right now for overseas mobile broadband data deals, although it is still expensive. It also offers mobile broadband laptop deals

Vodafone is the only British owned mobile broadband UK network: it has operations in more than 20 countries and is in fact the biggest mobile network company in the world (by turnover). Launched in 1985, it was one of the UK's original two mobile networks (alongside BT Cellnet, now O2). Vodafone helped pioneer mobile broadband, launching mobile broadband for business customers in 2004 and for consumers shortly afterwards. October 2008 saw the first of its so-called 'free' laptop deals, throwing in a Dell laptop and dongle on a long term mobile internet contract. It launched 'top up and go' in December 2008.

Vodafone announced a network infrastructure collaboration with O2 in March 2009 - the biggest deal of its kind in the world to date. The two mobile internet providers will build future mobile sites together, as well as merging existing ones, aiming to improve coverage, future-proof their network and of course cut costs.

2010 saw Vodafone branch into both mobile Wi-Fi units and SIM cards/deals for handheld tablet devices. In 2011 it introduced its ‘data test drive’ service, letting new smartphone customers use as much data as they like for the first three months of their contract so they can more easily set their required data limit going forward.

In August 2013 Vodafone launched its fledgling 4G mobile broadband service in the UK, beginning with a limited rollout to parts of London and gradually expanding across the country.